Monday, July 10, 2006

Vegetable season



For the first year since we've moved here, our garden has worked well enough to have several home-grown veggies. I bought the cantaloupe at the local farmer's market, but we grew the pink-eyed peas, tomatoes, eggplant, and okra. (I forgot to put the cucumbers and peppers on the plate before taking the picture.)



This is the first time I've tried growing edible flowers for salads. They are more for color than taste, but I'm happy with the results. These are bachelor's buttons, calendula, and borage, all from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds. (I also had good luck with the nasturtiums and chamomile.)

14 comments:

swamp4me said...

I don't know that I would want to call those peas "pink-eyed." Sounds like some sort of ophthalmic disorder ;)

The food looks great -- what time is dinner?

KFarmer said...

Now that's what I call a "home-made" dinner. Yummy! Makes me hungry just looking at it :)

Ron Sullivan said...

Oh, that's lovely. Can you FedEx a plate to Twisty? I think she'll need it tonight.

Nasturtiums are the tastiest flower I know. Peppery! And the leaves are edible too; I've had them parboiled and I've had them just barely steamed. Milder than the flowers but nice.

robin andrea said...

The food looks delicious. Yum. I love the colors that flowers add. We like to add chive flowers to our salads. Tasty and pretty.

Floridacracker said...

Leslie over at palazzo rospo had a borage accented salad from her garden posted a few days ago. It does look beautiful.

Ericka said...

umm, nasturtiums! yummy. i used to attack my mom's flower beds. she gets after me when i start munching on her flowers - threatens me just like i'm a bunny.

*gigglesnort* so, you grew all these yummy, healthy vegetables, and then you deepfried all of them? oh-kay. ;-)

KatyaR said...

Wow, that salad looks gorgeous--and yummy! Love the way the blue brings out the other colors.

Rurality said...

Ha! I never thought of it that way... but pink-eyed is the real name! I think they have a lot more taste than black-eyed peas.

Erika, no, actually only the okra is fried. And if I could find a good non-slimy way to cook it other than frying, I'd do it! (Suggestions welcome. :)

The eggplants are marinated in Italian dressing, then dredged in a cornmeal/parmesan cheese/salt & pepper mixture, and baked.

happy and blue 2 said...

It all looks good. I wouldn't eat it but normal people probably would..

Stu said...

First, seriously, it is awesome to have you back blogging regularly. Reading your blog is like a mini-episode of something on Discovery or HGTV.

Second, help me out:
What Is This Tree?

The dykes next door said...

I came to see the blog of someone who likes Eating Raoul, and found gorgeous photographs! We have a garden, with heirloom tomatoes, okra, squash, peppers, but yours are far more attractive than ours! I grew up in the country (in south Louisiana) and I miss it. I really enjoyed reading your posts! Thank you!

Rurality said...

Stu, thanks. I don't know, but I'll ask Ron and see if she does.

DND, ha! I tried that Blogger feature back when I first started... I remember there were only a handful of people who mentioned that movie. I love Paul Bartel!

KFarmer said...

I have a recipe that I got out of Southern Living Magazine that calls for baking breaded okra and for dipping purposes- horse radish dip. I will look it up if you're interested. You can use the recipe for all kinds of different veggies-mushrooms, peppers, etc.

Hick said...

See...these photos are why I didn't tell you about the food photo contest that I'm entering. You would beat me like a drum.

I can't grow nasturtiums to save my life...and everyone keeps telling me they are the easiest of all flowers to grow. I think I'll stick to growing mold in the fridge.